13 July 2017

Beachhead Assault - The Story of the Royal Naval Commandos in World War II

The Royal Naval Commandos had one of the most dangerous and the most important tasks of any in World War II - they were first on to the invasion beaches and they were the last to leave.

Formed in 1941 as the Royal Naval Beach Parties, many lost their lives in the Dieppe raid. After Dieppe they became fully fledged fighting Commandos with their legendary Fairbairn Sykes commando knives, organised into units from A Commando through to the all Canadian W Commando.

Under their officers who were designated as Beachmasters, the Royal Naval Commandos led the way in on the beaches as part of the Allied landings in Madagascar, Dieppe, North Africa, Pantelleria, Sicily, Salerno, the Volturno River, Anzio, Arakan, D Day, Elba, Walcheren and Commachio. Their work on the beaches was crucial to the success of the Allied invasions.

After the War the Royal Naval Commandos were disbanded and forgotten. Their wartime role was given to the Royal Marines. But now through the personal accounts of many of the Royal Naval Commandos themselves this book tells their remarkable story. It is a story which covers their beginnings early in the War and their training, both at their base HMS Armadillo at Ardentinny in Scotland and the famous Achnacarry Commando training school, through to the invasions where they led the way in.

Beachhead Assault includes a Foreword by Man and Boy author Tony Parsons, whose father was a Royal Naval Commando who fought at Elba. It also contains a preface by Ken Oakley, Chairman of the Royal Naval Commando Association.

Available from:
Frontline Books

11 July 2017

295th Ordnance Heavy Maintenance Company Audio Book

The 295th Ordnance Heavy Maintenance Company (FA) was a Field Army company of the United States Army from April 16, 1943, until January 1, 1946. Serving under the First, Second, Third, Seventh, and Ninth Army divisions, the company participated in the liberation of Europe during World War II.

Mike Rockett's grandfather, James T. Rockett, served with the Company, and he has created an audiobook which details the history of the Company, and their service.

Information on the 295th Ordnance Heavy Maintenance Company can be found on Mike's site - www.295th.com, including interviews with some members and a number of photos. A summary of their service can be found here:

1 Training
1.1 Camp Sutton
1.2 Camp Toccoa
1.3 Camp Campbell
1.4 Tennessee Maneuvers
1.5 Camp Forrest
1.6 Fort McPherson
1.7 Camp Gordon
1.8 Fort Jackson
1.9 Camp Kilmer
2 Battle Operations
2.1 Port of Embarkation
2.2 Liverpool, England
2.3 Wem
2.4 Ninth Army
2.5 Weymouth
2.6 Le Havre, France
2.7 Camp Twenty Grand
2.8 Vis, Belgium
2.9 Maastricht, Holland
2.10 Tegelen, Holland
2.11 Neukirchen-Vluyn, Germany
2.12 Sterkrade, Germany
2.13 Detmold, Germany
Occupation in Post-War Europe
3.1 Ammendorf, Germany
3.2 Gotha, Germany
3.3 Karlsfeld, Germany

The audio book contains the full narrated story of the Company, and contains many additional details not featured on the website.

Available to download from:

7 July 2017

Cassel and Hazebrouck 1940: France and Flanders Campaign

This is the first detailed account of the rearguard action that took place between 25 and 29 May 1940 at Cassel and Hazebrouck on the western perimeter of the Dunkirk Corridor.

By 25 May the decision to evacuate the BEF via Dunkirk had already been taken, Lord Gort, commanding the BEF in France, had given instructions to Lieutenant General Sir Ronald Adam to relinquish his command of III Corps and prepare a perimeter of defence around Dunkirk. As part of the western defensive line of the Dunkirk Corridor, 145 Brigade were deployed to Cassel and Hazebrouck with the instructions to hold the two towns until the last man.

Under the command of Brigadier Nigel Somerset, the brigade occupied Hazebrouck with the infantry of 1st Buckinghamshire Battalion and Cassel with the 4/Ox and Bucks Light Infantry together with the regulars of the 2nd Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment. Attached to Somerset s meagre force was a number of units that had previously been part of two of Gort s ad hoc formations - Macforce and Woodforce, and it was with these men that the two towns were fortified against the advancing German armoured divisions.

While Hazebrouck was overwhelmed very quickly, the hilltop town of Cassel held out for much longer with German forces failing to consolidate any penetration of the perimeter. The book looks closely at the deployment of units in both towns and focuses on the individuals involved in the defence and the subsequent break-out, which ended in capture or death for so many.

There are two car tours that explore the surrounding area of Cassel and the deployment of platoons within Hazebrouck. These are supplemented by two walking tours, one in Cassel itself and the second further to the west of the town around the area controlled by B and D Companies of the 2nd Gloucesters. The book is illustrated with ten maps and over 100 modern and contemporary photographs.

Available from:
Pen & Sword